Thursday, January 28, 2016

The Whiplash Plateau

My interview on the final weekly C-Realm Podcast. KMO is moving on, so am I (in various ways) and so we took some time to recap and draw some conclusions. It's the end of an era. Please have a listen.

7 comments :

Robert Goad said...

KMO is right: waiting for collapse has been getting pretty boring for some time now and it is wise to move on to other things. Or; once you are prepped for a hurricane time for the cane party. You are correct that being south of the border is a good place to be. After over two years here in southern Mexico the highs still beat out the lows (troughs like language acquisition struggles, infrastructure, materialism and class idiocy, etc.) and it's nice to feel somewhat out of the major impact zone. The big nugget for me in this podcast is once again hearing that "precious metals", in your own possession, is basically pretty illogical in the end. There's a wonderful new suite of metal working tools and other real things glowing lovingly ahead. Humping a metal lump gets old fast when crossing borders or clever ways to safeguard it. If a choice between a alcohol still and a bag of silver rounds then it's a no-brainer. Overall a enjoyable listen and thank you for sharing.

clive mossmoon said...

Bitcoins are not scarce, per se. Their finite supply is infinitely divisible so they can be as plentiful or as scarce as the market determines. Deflation is not a problem. As the price of bitcoin has risen, more, not less, goods and services have been purchased using bitcoin, exactly the opposite of what all the economists predicted. When the block reward halves again this year many of the big mining farms will go bankrupt, as they should, and will be replaced with much smaller, more decentralized chips which are already available thanks to Moore's law. Interestingly I recently read that 20% of Russians are using bitcoin in place of credit cards, the highest of any country.

jeremy said...

That was a rather painful interview for me, Dmitri. Not to flatter you, but you are a goldmine of wisdom and I felt that the interviewer didn't really appreciate that or take advantage of the opportunity to benefit from that. I was intrigued when at the close you mentioned "south of the border", which made me wonder if you would be willing to disclose some regions that are not going to hell in a hand basket, if there are any. I'm an American expat living scared in Europe and wondering where to go next. I've been trying to learn some Russian thinking maybe that will be the only reasonable place to migrate to, assuming that is even possible. I read with pleasure your articles on living in Siberia, but I'm old and I know such a life is out of the question for me in my remaining years. Also toying with the idea of Puerto Rico. If you can drop a few hints or point me to some things you have already written that address this need, I would be most grateful.

R.J.Cavazos said...

Insightful interview. Close was key. It is important to move on from the U.S. A brief note to Jeremy--there are a lot of other places in Latin America besides Puerto Rico (PR). PR is a U.S. colony and its been thoroughly corrupted by U.S. fast food, marketing and welfare state. Plus its now being looted by the moneylenders if you will.

Agree with Dmitry--South of the Border is where its at. Espero con mucha anticipacion el enaugro del Club Orlov en Espanol. En Mexico tiene su casa Dmitry.

Robert Goad said...

Jeremy: hard to go wrong in latin america, especially well off "the the gringo trail". Gracious society and polite, well affordable, no heating or cooling bills in the altiplano and tons of food, 90% catholic so no (radical) muslim problems for a good while if at all, politicos more interested in greed than control, and B-grade rock star status with the locals while the old image of the USA lasts down here. Good resources are over 20 year expat Johnny Muellers podcast "The Expat Files", VivaTropical if you have more money, etc.. NOT International Living: anything they report on is already on the way to being spoiled and expensive. Best regards on your expat locale hunt.

Mister Roboto said...

I don't blame you for giving up on the USA. Practically nobody here sees or hears anything they don't want to see or hear. It's very frustrating.

de amateureconoom said...

Dear Dimitry,
I understand the diappointement about your efforts, but For me your writings are the most valuable ever read anywhere. You rock man.
I have all your writings in special files on paper and they are being read regularly
by me. I have the same experience here in center of Eu (brussels)Belgium. People prefer to stay uninformed and stupid.
Love you my man